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Indiana – Tour an Amish Farm

Tour a Real Amish Farm

When we were planning our trip to Amish Country, Indiana, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that touring a real, working Amish farm was an option. I definitely wanted to sign up for that. An Amish man named Kenny offers buggy rides as well as farm tours. We met him in downtown Shipshewana where he picked us up in a buggy.

Amish buggy tour
He then drove us through town and out into the country. It was a scenic and relaxing ride accompanied by the clip clop of horse hooves.

Buggy ride through Amish Country Indiana

Although most Amish people do not want to be photographed, Kenny was described to me as someone who “pushes the Amish envelope.” He didn’t mind being photographed. When we arrived at his son’s farm, he happily posed for a picture with us inside the barn.

Inside an Amish barn Indiana

Kenny’s grandchildren were at the farm and helped give the tour.

Amish farm children

I wonder if his grandchildren think that it’s funny that tourists would come and pay money to help them with their chores. One of the first things we did was feed some of the horses.

Feeding horses at an Amish farm

We had lots of opportunities to pet the animals.

Petting a calf at an Amish farm in Indiana

I’m not sure if my kids had ever milked a cow before this. After watching them demonstrate, we got to try it ourselves.

Milking cows at an Amish farm

We were a little surprised to find out that they do not milk the cows by hand. They have automated equipment to do it. And, yes, they have electricity. They said they need refrigeration to keep the milk cold.

Cow milking equipment at an Amish farm

Kenny taught us about all the steps it takes for milk to go from the cow to the grocery store. It was very informative. He also taught us about different types of cows. We got to enjoy a cup of some delicious ice cream. My kids really liked that part! Then it was time to feed the calves. One of Kenny’s granddaughters demonstrated and then we got to try it ourselves.

Feeding a calf at an Amish Farm - Indiana

Amish farm tour - feeding calf

Isn’t the calf adorable? We got to meet another calf who was just one day old. So, so sweet!

Baby calf at Amish farm

Some of the animals were quite affectionate. This one seemed to want to give my daughter a hug.

Hugging a cow

The cows were even affectionate to the cats!

Cow kisses

After our tour ended, Kenny took us back to Shipshewana in the buggy. It was another relaxing ride through the countryside and we drove past one of the Quilt Gardens. We thoroughly enjoyed our Amish farm tour. It was one of the favorite parts of our Amish Country trip.

 

Ready to visit?

Buggy Lane Tours
140 N. Harrison St.
Shipshewana, IN 46565

(574) 825-5474
(574) 238-4498

Farm tour: $18 adults, $9 children (6-12)

Farm tour with dinner: $49 per person

Buggy rides only, per person: $4 – 7 minutes, $7 – 14 minutes. A 30-minute ride is $30 for two, $8 for each additional person.

Customized tours available

 

Disclosure: We received complimentary admission to this tour so that I could research and write this article. Many thanks to the Amish Country/Elkhart County Convention & Visitors Bureau for coordinating our trip.

 

You might also be interested in

Quilt Gardens (Indiana)

Amish Acres (Indiana)

Cycling Through Amish Country (Indiana)

Cook’s Bison Ranch (Indiana)

Billings Farm & Museum (Vermont)

Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill (Kentucky)

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